Kansas Association of Mappers

Breakout Session Topics

Here are the breakout sessions we have planned during the 2019 conference. All presentations are subject to change.

Address Points: A Better Way to Deliver Geographic Information
Adventures in Geospatial Automation: How ArcGIS Streamlined a Stormwater Billing Process
Arcade: What's the Point
ArcGIS Apps for the Field
ArcGIS Enterprise: An Introduction
ArcGIS Online for Organizations
ArcGIS Pro: Task Lists and Templates
Basic Title Insurance
BFE Portal and Web Resources
Clutter and Anarchy: A Story of the Unified Government's ArcGIS Online Organization
Collector App for At-Grade Public Rail Crossings
Election Solutions
Fancy Maps
Flooding 2019
How a GIS was used in Coffey County's Emergency Response to the 2019 Flooding
Improving Situational Awareness with Real-Time Flood Mapping in Kansas: Live Action from Spring 2019
Investigating controls on lateral erosion in a small bedrock river over long and short timescales
Innovative Technologies to Improve Site Characterization: Deriving Actionable Intelligence from your Drone Data
Kansas NG911 GIS User Group
KDHE Online Tools
KDOT Resources
Mapping Using Drone Imagery: Agricultural and Natural Resource Applications
Open Data and the Esri Hub
ORKA Update
Role of LiDAR-Derived Stream Network Datasets
State Plane Coordinate System of 2022
Tornado Emergency

Address Points: A Better Way to Deliver Geographic Information

Robert Meier, GIS Analyst
TREKK Design Group

ESRI has made it easy to publish data and create mapping applications in ArcGIS Online. These "traditional" mapping applications require a search, then multiple clicks for a user to find information. Address Point data, attributed with many geographic descriptors, such as; zoning, wards, school districts, police districts and land ownership, can be the basis of a simple and easy to use mapping application requiring less clicks and a friendlier user experience. Using attributed Address Points an ArcGIS Online application can be created where a single query of an address, can display multiple attributes such as those listed previously and can even include links to other sites. Finding the time to maintain Address Points can be a challenge for many GIS professionals, since addresses and geographic boundaries change on a regular basis. TREKK Design Group has automated the maintenance of Address Points through Python scripting. The process reads data paths from a file and copies fields and attributes (point in polygon) from listed polygon-based data (zoning, school districts, etc.) to the target Address Points. The Address Points have to be loaded onto ArcGIS Online while the polygon-based data, can be stored on a local drive, ArcGIS Server or ArcGIS Online. This presentation will show the difference between "traditional" mapping applications and ones based on Address Points. To aid in understanding the update process, some Python code will be shown and discussed.

Back to top

Adventures in Geospatial Automation: How ArcGIS Streamlined a Stormwater Billing Process
Daniel Gwartney, GIS Group Lead / SR Geospatial Scientist
Wood Environment & Infrastructure

Originally, the annual process for regenerating stormwater utility fees for the Southeast Metro Stormwater Authority was cumbersome and expensive. Efforts were largely manual and required data transfer between various programs. The step-by-step “guidance manual” for fee-calculation processes was over 400 pages, and comparison between previous to current records was difficult. Wood has worked to substantially automate the effort via sophisticated ESRI geoprocessing models and streamlined manual processes. As a result, the manual is now 1/10 the size, is more efficient, and only technically requires one software package - ArcGIS. File Geodatabases are now used to store all account information, while models generate master account files with consistent naming conventions. Metrics, linkages, and updates are more easily performed with the new file structure. Additionally, this same geoprocessing workflow is easily transferable to countless other stormwater billing systems. The presentation will discuss both billing systems, details of the GIS-based approach, and lessons learned.

Back to top

Arcade: What's the Point?
Amy Roust, Senior GIS Analyst
Douglas County

I didn't choose a career in GIS because I love to code. So when Esri unveiled a brand new language called Arcade, I wasn't exactly jumping for joy. Why should I learn yet another language when I'm already striving to keep current with Python, SQL, JavaScript, HTML5, CSS, and VBScript? Join me for a frank assessment of this relatively new feature to the ArcGIS platform. I'll share what I've learned about Arcade so far and what I feel are the pros and cons of the language in its current state. Please note that I am not a programmer or developer. I will share some code samples, but I'm not going to delve deeply into the language's structure, logic, or syntax.

Back to top

ArcGIS Apps for the Field
Tim Hensley, Solution Engineer
Esri

ArcGIS includes a suite of mobile field apps to help you collect data, navigate to locations, coordinate assignments, and monitor field operations. Learn how Workforce for ArcGIS works together with Navigator for ArcGIS, Collector for ArcGIS, Survey123 for ArcGIS, Explorer for ArcGIS, and Operations Dashboard for ArcGIS to optimize fieldwork. 

Back to top

ArcGIS Enterprise: An Introduction
Tim Hensley, Solution Engineer
Esri

ArcGIS Enterprise is the next evolution of the server product line. It includes all the components that you're familiar with: ArcGIS Portal, Server, and more. Join us in this workshop to get an introduction to ArcGIS Enterprise and the many capabilities that have been introduced, such as Portal collaboration, Insights for ArcGIS, ArcGIS Image Server, ArcGIS GeoEvent Server and ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server.

Back to top

ArcGIS Online for Organizations
Micah Seybold, GIS Manager
City of Lawrence

The City of Lawrence has used ArcGIS Online for Organizations going on 7 years. The speaker will explore various methods available to manage the system with examples from experience. Topics covered include various methods used for user, group and item management, workflow decision making to meet the needs and exploring various way to promote the use of web apps and dashboards.

Back to top

ArcGIS Pro: Task Lists and Templates
Linda Sibert, GIS Specialist
Kansas Department of Agriculture

Stream line and automate your work using Task list. Project and layout templates; project, layer and map packages; and finally map, and layer files. What is the differences and best use cases for each type of sharing options.

Back to top

Basic Title Insurance
Darlene Flynn, Title Examiner-Abstractor
Kansas Secured Title

Basic Explanation of Title Insurance / What it Title Insurance? / Owner’s Policy-Lender’s policy / Covers the history of the property going back in time / Unlike car insurance or life insurance, which covers future events / Other Title Research projects / County Tax Sale / Ownership and Encumbrance Reports / 50 Year Title Search-Environmental / Databases used for research / Appraisers site – Ownership, legal, physical address, taxes and special taxes / ROD/courts indexes and Federal courts in counties that have federal courts / We DO NOT research county engineer survey files, city regulations, planning rules and ordinances, and we DO NOT insure compliance with county and city regulations, zoning or rules. / GIS systems / Arial views, how RE sits on property, water and access to public road, legal description vs deed description. Mapping programs / Transverse PC & Map Draw and others (compiling a list) / Pencil. Paper, Pronto and Scale / Alta Surveys and their purpose / Commercial Property-high $$ means higher risk. Lenders have more stringent requirements. / Question and Answer session

Back to top

BFE Portal and Web Resources
Bill Pace, Floodplain Mapping Specialist
Department of Water Resources, Kansas Department of Agriculture

No abstract available.

Back to top

Clutter and Anarchy: A Story of the Unified Government's ArcGIS Online Organization
April Friedl, GIS Developer
Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, KS

Employees at the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, KS have been using ArcGIS Online (AGOL) since 2014. There was never a formal strategy on how to implement, manage, and use AGOL; the only plan was just to get more people using it. Fast forward five years and the Unified Government has 112 ArcGIS Online users (111 publishers), 2,653 pieces of content, 1,661 layers, 583 maps, and 296 apps. There are old user accounts, maps and apps with broken links and functionality, users who should not be publishers, AGOL groups that were never implemented, and several near-identical copies of ancient data. This presentation will focus on the steps the Unified Government took to clean up its AGOL Organization account including developing a steering committee, policies, workflows, accountability, basic training for users, and manual and automated data updates.

Back to top

Collector App for At-Grade Public Rail Crossings
Kyle Gonterwitz, GIS Manager
Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT)

KDOT will present on how the collector app is being used to collect information about approximately 5,500 at-grade public highway-railroad crossings in the State of Kansas using Sparx Enterprise Architect for geodatabase design, ArcGIS and ArcPro for publishing hosted feature services to ArcGIS online and for data review and validation, the Esri Collector App for field data collection and Mapillary for photo. In addition to the technology architecture and approaches, the presentation will include details about version control and change management, including developing and delivering training and documentation to support the program, which is designed to meet FRA Highway-Railroad Crossing requirements and transportation planning initiatives.

Back to top

Election Solutions
Tim Hensley, Solution Engineer
Esri

Esri's Election Solutions changed significantly at the beginning of 2019. The overall Election Solution has been compartmentalized into the concepts of Outreach, Management and Results. This presentation will discuss these compartments and focus on how they can be leveraged by Election Office and GIS Personnel. Discussions will revolve around identifying Election Polling Places, providing Polling Place Wait Times, identifying Elected Officials and the dissemination of Election Results, either in real time on election night, or after the election has been certified.

Back to top

Fancy Maps
Jared Tremblay, Project Manager
Flint Hills MPO

Bring your laptop and learn to play around with the free InDesign-like program Inkscape. Break free of ESRI restrictions and see how Inkscape can open a world of quick & beautiful maps.

Back to top

Flooding 2019
Mike D'Attilio, GIS Coordinator
Kansas Department of Emergency Management (KDEM)

No abstract available.

Back to top

How a GIS was used in Coffey County's Emergency Response to the 2019 Flooding
Cara Mays, GIS Coordinator
Coffey County

Like most of Eastern Kansas, Coffey County experienced extensive flooding during the May and June months due to excessive rainfall. In Coffey County, homes were damaged or destroyed and several homeowners had to be evacuated. This session will aim to give a little insight on how GIS resources can be used in an actual emergency response effort as well as gain insight on how to better be prepared for your next emergency. Coffey County is home to John Redmond Reservoir, a flood control reservoir managed by the US Army Corp of Engineers Tulsa District. Before this flooding event, the max release by the Corp at John Redmond was 21,000 cubic feet per second. During the peak of this flooding event the Corp was releasing close to 35,000 cubic feet per second. Because this potential release extent from John Redmond was unfamiliar and the area had not seen rainfall totals of this magnitude since the construction of John Redmond, the county and city officials relied heavily on GIS data to predict the potentially affected areas and provide data and visual aids for all other response efforts.

Back to top

Improving Situational Awareness with Real-Time Flood Mapping in Kansas: Live Action from Spring 2019
Jude Kastens, Research Associate Professor
Kansas Biological Survey

In May of this this year, record-level widespread flooding came to Kansas, impacting most major rivers and reservoirs in the eastern half of the state. Past funding from GIS Policy Board database development grants supported the creation of inundation map libraries for the greater eastern half of Kansas, the vast majority of which utilize the state’s LiDAR elevation data collection. During the peak of the 2019 spring flooding, the Kansas Biological Survey (KBS) worked closely with the Kansas Water Office (KWO) and the Kansas Division of Emergency Management (KDEM) to implement the flood libraries and provide timely and regularly updated time-specific and projected maximum inundation extents. Though real-time flood mapping technology continues to improve, KBS’s one-of-a-kind, flexible, rapid, wide-area inundation library approach remains at the forefront. KBS intends to continue to coordinate with KDEM, KWO and other agencies to develop a strategic plan for real-time flood mapping in Kansas.

Back to top

Investigating controls on lateral erosion in a small bedrock river over long and short timescales
Abbey Marcotte, Graduate Student, Kansas State University
2019 JCM Scholarship Winner

Bedrock rivers play a crucial role in landscape evolution; erosion and subsequent channel adjustment in these systems occurs through a complex combination of stream discharge, sediment transport, and climate. While much is known about how bedrock rivers erode vertically into their channel bed, controls on lateral erosion remain poorly understood. This study's objective is to investigate erosional processes of Kings Creek, a small bedrock stream located within Konza Prairie, using erosion pins, structure from motion photogrammetry (SfM), and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating. Erosion pins are installed in exposed bedrock in the channel banks to measure modern erosion rates in resistant limestone and erodible shale bedrock. We use SfM, a range imaging technique, to create high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of channel banks. Through repeated surveys, DEMs of difference can be generated to evaluate patterns and volumes of bedrock erosion. We will use OSL dating of fluvial deposits overlying stream terraces at the study site, which will yield an age of when the stream occupied the terrace, as well as characterize deposition rates and the duration of lateral channel migration. Upon successful dating of fluvial deposits, OSL data coupled with SfM data and erosion pin measurements will ultimately reveal patterns of past and current lateral erosion, thus improving our understanding of how bedrock rivers erode laterally over time to form wide bedrock valleys.

Back to top

Innovative Technologies to Improve Site Characterization: Deriving Actionable Intelligence from your Drone Data
Michael Rawitch, Senior Consultant
Ramboll

Recent improvements in the fields of remote sensing, computing power, and web-based GIS, allow for the implementation of new workflows facilitating an unprecedented level of understanding in site characterization. Large volumes of data can quickly be collected and compiled into three-dimensional models, digital surface models, volumes, high-resolution orthomosaic images, oblique photography, and aerial videography. This large volume of data can be processed into a cohesive story using web-based GIS to share with stakeholders including consultants, regulators, clients, and local communities. During this presentation, we will discuss the collection of imagery data using remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS or drones) on several sites and review innovative methodologies that can be used to characterize these sites through several case studies. These case studies will show how we create value from drone data by automating advanced imagery analyses, including methodologies for change detection over time, automated feature extraction, volumetric analysis, hydrologic analysis, integration into mobile field devices, and vegetation monitoring at environmental projects.

Back to top

Kansas NG911 GIS User Group
Eileen Battles, Manager
Kansas Data Access and Support Center (DASC)

The Kansas NG911 GIS User Group meets quarterly to discuss the NG911 project and NG911 GIS related updates. This session will provide a project update but will focus mainly on audience questions and discussion.

Back to top

KDHE Resources
Nolita LeVoie
Kansas Department of Health and Environment

KDHE provides many public web map applications and other online tools in a effort to improve state government transparency. This presentation will highlight and explore the online tools available to quickly find environmental data that KDHE maintains.

Back to top

KDOT Resources
Kyle Gonterwitz, GIS Manager
Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT)

An overview of GIS and Mapping resources brought to you by the Kansas Department of Transportation, including web services, maps, projections, and applications.

Back to top

Mapping Using Drone Imagery: Agricultural and Natural Resource Applications
Kevin Price, Chief Emerging Technologies Officer
Air Data Solutions, LLC

You can read about drones in the news on nearly a daily basis. Drones are but a platform for acquiring remotely sensed data from an aerial perspective. Dr. Price became involved in the use of drones in 2010 and since has acquired hundreds of thousands of images from drones for mapping and vegetation studies. Much is said about drones, but their applications can be more complex than one may realize and mapping with the imagery can be challenging. Mappers who use imagery are most likely aware of image distortions such as radial displacement, off nadir viewing, reflectance variation caused by varying target geometric and biochemical properties and incoming solar radiation variation, vignetting, scale variation, edge matching, signal-to-noise issues, and more. During this presentation, Dr. Price will discuss what can and cannot be done well with drones, the challenges of using the imagery, and will show the amazing applications that are possible with the drone platform and discuss issues with sensors one should know before investing in them. The future of this technology is exciting but can be very disappointing if one does not understand how to avoid costly pitfalls.

Back to top

Open Data and the Esri Hub
Darren Haag, Solutions Architect
City of Topeka

Open data has become a hot-button item in recent years as governments and organizations are pushing towards more transparency. The City of Topeka recently launched a new open data site completely powered by the ESRI HUB. In this presentation, we will discuss the site, what needed to happen to move forward with it, why your organization should look into open data, and the steps that could be involved in the initiative.

Back to top

ORKUpdate
Kristen Jordan Koenig, GIS Developer
Kansas Data Access and Support Center (DASC)

ORKA is expanding from a basic property viewer website into a variety of products including a new management portal. Come hear about new products available and how to start using the ORKA Portal (PORKA).

Back to top

Role of LiDAR-Derived Stream Network Datasets

Atefeh Hosseini, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Kansas Geological Survey, University of Kansas
John Dunham, Kansas Geological Survey
Elizabeth Smith, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Water

High-resolution National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) data are the basis for a number of state and federal regulations, including the Clean Water Act, and are critical for protecting important wetlands and inland marsh ecosystems (e.g., Quivira National Wildlife Refuge). These data are a central component of understanding how land use affects water quality. Climate change and land-surface conditions that affect surface channel drainage over time mean NHD-mapped hydrography flowlines must be updated. Since elevation is the key factor driving surface channels, flow networks derived from LiDAR DEMs provide a much higher level of detail than the existing NHD flowlines. Recent LiDAR acquisitions over large portions of Kansas, available at 1-m resolution, represent an opportunity to significantly improve the accuracy of NHD stream features. Here we explore the potential to use Esri ArcGIS hydrological tools with a suite of Python programming to generate stream features from LiDAR-based flow direction and accumulation estimates. The Middle Arkansas-Slate River sub-basin, with total drainage area of 216,711 acres (87,700 ha), was selected to assess the performance of the proposed method.

Back to top

State Plane Coordinate System of 2022
Ken Nelson, KDOT, and Steve Thompson

In 2022, the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) will be modernized. Existing reference frames (horizontal datums & vertical datums), including the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD83) & North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88), will be replaced with new reference frames. The State Plane Coordinate System of 2022 (SPSC2022) is being developed as part of this transition. In April 2019, the National Geodetic Survey released the policy, procedures, and timeline that will govern this transition. Attend this session to learn more about the Kansas SPSC2022 plan.

Back to top

Tornado Emergency
Bryce Hirschman, GIS Coordinator
Douglas County

Rick Miller once told me “GIS data holdings are only as good as the last emergency.” I believed it then and I believe it now. Douglas County has been hit by a five (5) tornadoes, a couple micro-bursts, and a couple isolated weather events that caused damage since 2003 and the responses, from a GIS perspective, have become better with each successive event. Join me as we take a GIS tour of the most recent tornado to hit Douglas and Leavenworth Counties. We will look at apps, maps, and photos, as well as go through the sequence of events that comprised the GIS effort to support Emergency Management, first responders, and the Kansas Damage Assessment Team (KDAT) inspectors.

Back to top

© 2019 Kansas Association of Mappers | kamappers@gmail.com | PO Box 3788 | Lawrence, KS 66046-0788 | Site DisclaimerJoin us on LinkedIn!

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software